Dan Reiland The Pastor's Coach – Developing Church Leaders

Category / Relationships

Even good leaders can have bad habits.

There are some scary truths about bad habits that hinder our ability to break them.

  • Scary truth #1: Sometimes we really don’t see the habit. (We need a friend to tell us.)
  • Scary truth #2: Sometimes we justify the habit because of heavy pressure or high productivity.
  • Scary truth #3: Sometimes we kind of like the habit, and we don’t want to stop.
  • Scary truth #4: Sometimes we’ve lived the habit so long, it becomes a lifestyle we adapt to.
  • Scary truth #5: Sometimes those around us let us off the hook when they should call us on it.
  • Scary truth #6: Sometimes we minimize and dismiss it because it’s not a “sin.”

One bad habit of mine is that I often run about 5 minutes late to a meeting, sometimes even 10 or more. It really is a bad habit. Being late doesn’t convey how much I value and care about the person who is waiting. It puts me in a rushed state of mind, and it communicates that maybe it’s OK for others to be late.

Read More

What do people want from their church leader?

You might be a senior pastor, volunteer small group leader, campus pastor, head usher, student pastor, or leader of the parking team.

Ultimately, people want the same basic things from you as a leader.

Some of the people you serve may place a lot of demands on you, and you’ll go crazy if you try to meet all those demands.

But I have found, in general, that most people are reasonable, and at the core, they want the same essentials from a leader.

Read More

Leading someone older than you can be challenging.

As the Boomer generation ages and hands the baton of leadership to the X’ers and Millennials, more and more young leaders find themselves leading those older than themselves.

This is an important question: Why do some young leaders do it well and some do it poorly?

I remember the first time this really hit me. On my first day as Executive Pastor in San Diego, I suddenly realized I would be leading staff who were older and more experienced than I was. That was intimidating, to say the least. Thoughts went through my mind like, “What do I have to offer them?” And, “Why would they listen to me?

Read More

A great conversation, through the lens of a leader, is based on purpose.

Emotion, heart and genuine connection play a vital part. And we absolutely should enjoy our conversations. But we respect and honor people more by being helpful, rather than what feels like hang time with a buddy.

Enjoyment and meaning come from purpose.

A common question is how to make the most of all the one to one meetings. I personally like to think of them as conversations rather than meetings. That creates a different picture for me.

Read More