Dan Reiland The Pastor's Coach – Developing Church Leaders

Category / Staffing

Hiring a staff member can be stressful.

It’s a big decision, and you never know for certain how it will work out.

Smart leaders will do everything possible to make a wise choice when hiring, not the fast choice.

When it comes to hiring, fast seems expedient, but more often than not, it’s expensive in the end.

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The concept of the campus pastor is a genius kind of idea.

For more than a decade, the roles and responsibilities of a campus pastor have been innovated by hundreds of leading multi-site churches.

Campus pastors, while many are very capable communicators, they focus more on leadership and shepherding than on teaching and preaching.

The weekend sermon from the primary communicator is broadcast to all campuses. The senior pastor or a small teaching team typically carries that responsibility, thereby saving time for the campus pastors to invest more in the people of their campus.

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I saw a sign that said: “Tell your boss the truth and the truth shall set you free.” It made me smile, but for a lot of staff that’s not so funny.

Have you ever wanted to confront your boss? Did you do it? How’d it go?

I wish we could have coffee and I could hear your story because I have great passion for this unique relationship between boss and employee to flourish. Yet I’m aware that similar to a marriage, it’s just not always that easy.

This might surprise you, but most of the time that I do get to hear a story about this issue in churches of all shapes and sizes, the answer to that question is “no.” The staff member never confronted their boss. Sometimes that’s a good thing. The confrontation wasn’t needed, or perhaps it was even inappropriate.

But most of the time they should have gone for it. That’s part of the foundation of a healthy and productive relationship.

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Hiring family members is a highly debated topic loaded with opinions on both sides.

It ranges from leaders who prefer hiring family as a first choice, to those who object to nepotism of any kind.

It might be a spouse, brother or sister, aunt or uncle, and sometimes a staff member’s son or daughter. We can all cite stories that are great examples of success, and stories that seem more like your worst nightmare.

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