Dan Reiland The Pastor's Coach – Developing Church Leaders

We love to lead when the sun is shining and the wind is at our back, but life and leadership doesn’t always go that way.

In fact, most experienced leaders will say that’s never reality. Things may be going well, you may even have good momentum, but there will always be obstacles to face. That’s part of leadership.

However, there are times when what you’re facing is more than everyday obstacles to overcome and problems to solve. It seems more like a storm at high seas.

There are times when your difficult circumstances create personal doubt and discouragement, but there is a way to lead through the storm.

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Humble leadership can be difficult to define.

It’s subjective, and then there’s that pesky old saying that goes something like, “if you think you’re humble, you’re not.”

Well, that might be true, but it’s not very helpful if humility is something we should embrace. I’m mean, then how do you know?

Scripture is clear that humility is a good thing and indicates that it’s the opposite of pride. (James 4:6) So, the concept of humility isn’t a mystery. In fact, Moses was known as the most humble man on the face of the earth (Numbers 12:3), and we know a lot about his life.

Jesus washed the disciple’s feet, (John 13:1-17), and humbled Himself by becoming obedient to death.  (Philippians 2:8) So, again, we do have clear examples of humble leaders in action.

But I rarely hear conversations of someone trying to “achieve” humility. Yes, I’m smiling as I write that.

Should a leader focus on avoiding pride or aspiring to humility?

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Jesus knew how to recruit.

When He said to Peter and Andrew; “Come, follow me,” He wanted, even anticipated a yes. (Matthew 4:18-19) Jesus had a purpose, showed passion, and focused on the person.

We all desire a yes, but how you go about it makes all the difference. The process of recruiting can either give something to the person or take something from them. It’s not always that black and white, but here’s what I mean.

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Jesus didn’t need people to help him.  He didn’t need twelve disciples.

Yet he chose them.

He could have been born, grown in stature and wisdom, taught, been put to death, raised from the grave, and returned to heaven without messing with twelve guys and their issues.

Jesus didn’t need to wrestle with things such as the tension from the men leaving their families, competing for status, arguing over who’s greatest, asking frustrating questions and an ultimate betrayal.

However, working through other leaders was God’s plan from the beginning.

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