Dan Reiland The Pastor's Coach – Developing Church Leaders

The year 2020 is just around the corner and change is non-negotiable.

That’s not a prophetic statement. The need for change in the local church is always in play. The issue is whether you are out in front, just keeping up, or playing catch-up.

  • When you are in front of the change curve, you gain the privilege of margin for innovation. You have the opportunity to design what is next and new for you.
  • Keeping up with change affords you the ability to remain relevant, though perhaps not cutting edge. You can borrow great ideas from others.
  • Trying to catch-up with change is something no leader wants. When you are behind the change curve it requires far more effort, resources and emotional energy than would otherwise be needed. This is true because you spend much more time convincing people of the need to change.

If you and I sat down over a cup of coffee and I asked you what needs to change in your church next year, would you have an immediate answer? I hope you would. All churches need change of some kind.

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Getting along with people can be more complicated than it appears. If it were easy, everybody would be good at it! 

How you treat people, how they treat you, what makes it work well, and why it doesn’t work when it doesn’t is always important to consider. 

Conflict is part of human nature. 

When the challenges and stress of leadership are added to everyday relationships, conflict is heightened. 

The speed and pressure of leadership increase the potential to overlook even the most simple and basic relationship skills. That always gets a leader in trouble. 

Treating someone in a way that you would not want them to treat you is never intentional, but it is inevitable without heartfelt effort. And that effort begins with paying attention to the simple, but not always easy, basics. 

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The ability to encourage others is an essential skill for any leader.

The desire to encourage others is an essential disposition of the heart for any leader.

In fact, if encouragement is not a natural part of your leadership, you may unintentionally push people away from you rather than draw them to you.

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It’s never fun to tell someone no, even when you know it’s best.

If you are like the vast majority of leaders in ministry, you love people. You want to help and empower others, but more often than we prefer, leadership requires unpopular answers.

In fact, a great deal of leadership is learning and practicing the art of saying no in a way that encourages, earns trust, and even inspires, rather than in a way that may alienate or discourage people.

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