Dan Reiland The Pastor's Coach – Developing Church Leaders

One of the highest compliments you can receive is to hear someone say, “I trust you.”

Don’t take that lightly. Trust takes time to earn but can be lost quickly.

As a leader, trust is usually extended to you upfront. It’s “on loan,” so to speak, until proven untrustworthy.

However, it’s not uncommon for good leaders to be caught by surprise when they are not trusted quite as fully as they thought they were.

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The concept of the campus pastor is a genius kind of idea.

For more than a decade, the roles and responsibilities of a campus pastor have been innovated by hundreds of leading multi-site churches.

Campus pastors, while many are very capable communicators, they focus more on leadership and shepherding than on teaching and preaching.

The weekend sermon from the primary communicator is broadcast to all campuses. The senior pastor or a small teaching team typically carries that responsibility, thereby saving time for the campus pastors to invest more in the people of their campus.

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As a church leader, I’m confident you love and care about people, but If you have been leading for more than one week, you have encountered a difficult person or two.

Recently a wonderful volunteer on the hospitality team told me that someone just left because of the coffee. The unhappy attendee said, “This coffee tastes like dirt.” He said it was weak and insisted that we do something about it. It didn’t matter that it was free. (Free is not an excuse for lousy coffee, but thousands of people seem to like it.) The volunteer offered the Starbucks brand, but the attendee was upset that it wasn’t free.

We all can be difficult or have a bad day, but there are chronic personalities that require intentional effort, maturity, and specific skill to lead.

As leaders we are called to love everyone, Jesus made that clear in John 13:34-35, but that does not mean we are to consistently tolerate behavior that harms the people and mission of the church.

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Misconceptions about local church ministry often result in ineffectiveness, disappointment, or even conflict.

A misconception refers to something we don’t see accurately, or our perspective is in some way skewed.

For example, a common misconception is that leadership in ministry is reserved for a few highly gifted and deeply spiritual people. If that were true, a lot of us wouldn’t make it.

Still, I hear far too many say something like, “Oh, I couldn’t possibly be a spiritual leader; I’m just not qualified.”

You can see the danger lurking in two directions.

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